Reading Lolita in Tehran

Pity is the password, says the poet John Shade in Nabokov’s Pale Fire. This respect for others, empathy, lies at the heart of the novel. It is the quality that links Austen to Flaubert and James to Nabokov and Bellow. This, I believe, is how the villain in modern fiction is born: a creature without compassion, without empathy. The personalized version of good and evil usurps and individualizes the more archetypal concepts, such as courage or heroism, that shaped the epic or romance. A hero becomes one who safeguards his or her individual integrity at almost any cost.

Reading Lolita in Tehran, Azar Nafisi

Azar Nafisi

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One thought on “Reading Lolita in Tehran

  1. Pingback: Books Read in 2013 | The cat that walks by herself

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